Problem Plants

While 113 different weed species have been found in the Abel Tasman, Project Janszoon and the Abel Tasman Birdsong Trust are particularly interested in what we call the “filthy fourteen”.

Each of these plants poses a threat to the Park in different ways. If you see or suspect any of these species in or around the Park, please let us know. You can report sightings on info@janszoon.org

If you wish to control any of these plants yourself, please ask us or the Department of Conservation for advice on the best means of control.

For more information about these weeds you can also go to www.weedbusters.org.nz

Grevillea [thumb]

Grevillea

Grevillea (Grevillea rosmarinifolia) is a classic example of the right plant in the wrong place. Originally from Australia, it is commonly found in gardens in Marahau, Nelson and Kaiteriteri, where it is prized for its pink flowers and long flowering period. It is likely to have been brought into Torrent Bay village as a garden plant, but instead found the Park’s...
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Wandering willie [thumb]

Wandering willie

Wandering willie (Tradescantia) was introduced into the Park by early settlers and is a ‘fingerprint of the past’. It generally occurs in areas where people once lived and worked, such as Totaranui, Awaroa River, Meadowbank and Bark Bay. Wandering willie is a ground cover plant that smothers the ground in shady forest areas, preventing native seedlings from establishing. Project Janszoon and the Birdsong...
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Periwinkle [thumb]

Periwinkle

Periwinkle (Vinca major, V. minor) was introduced into the Park by early settlers and is a ‘fingerprint of the past’. It generally occurs in areas where people once lived and worked, such as Totaranui, Awaroa River, Meadowbank and Bark Bay. It is a ground cover plant that smothers the ground in shady forest areas, preventing native seedlings from establishing. Project Janszoon and...
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Ivy [thumb]

English ivy

English ivy (Hedera helix) was introduced into the Park by early settlers and is a ‘fingerprint of the past’. It generally occurs in areas where people once lived and worked, such as Totaranui, Awaroa River, Meadowbank and Bark Bay. English ivy is a climber that kills plants from ground level to canopy in lowland forest and can even bring down whole trees....
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Cotoneaster [thumb]

Cotoneaster

Cotoneaster (Cotoneaster glaucophyllus) is another plant that was popular with early settlers and was planted widely in areas where people once lived and worked, such as Totaranui, Awaroa River, Meadowbank and Torrent Bay. An evergreen shrub, originating in the Chinese Himalayas, which can grow 1–3 m high, it is not particularly valued as a garden plant these days. However it has managed...
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Holly [thumb]

Holly

Holly (Ilex aquifolium) is an evergreen, shrub or small tree with lots of branches and glossy dark leaves. It competes with native plants for light and can form dense thickets. It is only known in the Park from some historic plantings at the Meadowbank Homestead at Awaroa. However it has spread widely from here at about a one kilometre radius.   Holly...
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Chilean rhubarb [thumb]

Chilean rhubarb

Chilean Rhubarb (Gunnera tinctoria) was introduced from South America and looks like ordinary garden rhubarb but on a larger scale. This ‘rhubarb on steroids’ was often planted in gardens for its interesting form. But it turned into such a problem plant that in 2008 it was banned from sale, propagation and distribution in New Zealand. We don’t know of any Chilean rhubarb in...
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Wattle Acacia spp [thumb]

Wattle

Wattle (Acacia spp) trees in the Park mostly originated from Australia and there are many species around. In the Park, they have established both as garden plantings, and through historic plantings by early settlers, such as behind Venture Creek at Awaroa, and between Anchor Bay and Te Pukatea Bay. Different species pose differing spread risks, but the one thing the species all...
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Douglas fir [thumb]

Douglas fir

Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) is a another classic example of the right plant in the wrong place. An important component of our forestry industry, Douglas fir is prized for its durability and resistance to decay. But, unfortunately, Douglas fir seed is very lightweight and can spread long distances by wind—up to about 10 km. This means that unwanted Douglas fir seedlings can...
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Old mans beard [thumb]

Old man’s beard

Old Man’s Beard (Clematis vitalba) is one of our worst weeds, but also one of our better-known. It is a climbing vine which can grow to 20 m tall, smothering and killing all plants up to the highest canopy and preventing native plants establishing. Its seed is spread by water or wind, and can be accidentally distributed in roading material and bark. Project...
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Banana passionfruit [thumb]

Banana passionfruit

Banana passionfruit (Passiflora tripartita) is one of our worst weeds, but also one of our better-known. It is a climbing vine which can grow to 20 m tall, smothering and killing all plants up to the highest canopy and preventing native plants establishing. Its seeds are spread by birds, possums and pigs so can also travel long distances. Project De–Vine is doing a...
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Pampas Cortaderia jubata [thumb]

Pampas

Pampas (Cortaderia jubata C. selloana) is a tall ‘cutty grass’ with large erect flower heads that flower in late January. It has the ability to form large clumps that crowd out natives completely and is not to be confused with our native toe toe, which is smaller and has drooping flower heads. Pampas has a very lightweight seed that is able...
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Climbing asparagus leaves [thumb]

Climbing asparagus

Climbing Asparagus (Asparagus scandens) is another climbing vine that can cause real problems in our native forest. It can cover the forest floor and understory up to 4 m preventing shrubs and trees from establishing. It can also ringbark and kill soft barked plants. Seeds are spread by birds, and tubers can re-sprout after being spread in dumped vegetation and soil. We don’t...
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Jasmine [thumb]

Yellow or Italian jasmine

Yellow or Italian jasmine (Jasminum humile) could become a major threat to the Park. This scrambling shrub can grow up to 2.5 m tall and has yellow trumpet-shaped flowers up to 2 cm long. Yellow Jasmine forms dense thickets, preventing the establishment of native plant seedlings. The fruit is spread by birds, or by dumped vegetation. It seems to thrive in fertile limestone...
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